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  • October 18, 1997

     

    Billboard Magazine

    Since the early '70s, Keith Richards has kicked back between Stones tours at his villa in Jamaica, rejuvenating his tapped spirit by singing and playing with a group of Rastafarian drummers right in his front room. He long considered these late-night sessions of song and spliff strictly of-the-moment, but Richards was finally persuaded to document the sounds made by his friends - whom he's dubbed the Wingless Angels.

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  • October 18, 1997


    He may be a rich, decadent superstar, but Keith Richards is still one of the brothers on the street at heart. At least, that is the message put across by Wingless Angels, an extracurricular project which for the first time brings to wider attention a 25-year association between the Rolling Stones guitarist and a group of Rastafarian drummers and singers from the village of Steertown in Jamaica.

    The songs, which place traditional chants such as "On Mount Zion" and "Roll Jordan Roll" alongside more recent standards including "Enjoy Yourself" ("It's Later Than You Think") and "Rivers of

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  • October 18, 1997

     

    An unlikely collaboration, but an utterly enchanting one, this album pairs the traditional drums and chant-like harmonies of Jamaican outfit the Wingless Angels with Rolling Stones Keith Richards.

    Recorded outside Keith's villa in the Jamaican hills, this is a solemn, uplifting album. With Richards discarding his usual raunchy style for some engagingly loose, subtle guitar lines, this mixes traditional songs with ska and reggae favourites to create a blissful, devotional mood. Five stars.

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  • October 18, 1997

     

    'Wingless Angels' (Island) offer a spirit-soothing hour of Jamaican-style gospel music, performed by a troupe of Rastafarian singer/drummers and their acoustic-guitar-strumming albino brother Keith Richards."

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  • October 18, 1997

     

    Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones strums along with a group of Jamaican Rastafarians. Say wha'? OK, he's a reggae fan of long-standing, having signed Peter Tosh to his band's label 20 years ago. He also pays guitar on Sly and Robbie's new album, but that hardly qualifies him for roots credibility. So how did this filthy rich, coke-snorting, booze-swilling, musically redundant and probably pig-chomping rock star - architect of a song called "Sympathy With the Devil" - get involved with five Rastas and a bar-room singer called Sister Maureen in the first place?

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  • October 18, 1997


    Wingless Angels is the debut release from Keith Richards' Mindless Records. The Nyabinghi, to which the Wingless Angels belong, are a strict Rastafarian sect; Old Testament dreadlock devotees who worship the Emperor Haile Selassie. Their Grounation drum sessions can last for days, lit by bonfires at night, with relay teams of drummers generating a spiritual force field, Wingless Angels' chants ancient and modern, evoke the spirit of tranquil resolution that the presence of Haile Selassie aroused among the Dreads.

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  • October 08, 1997

     

    While Rolling Stone Keith Richards criss-crosses the globe on his band's Bridges to Babylon tour, one of his side projects is embarking on a journey of its own.

    Wingless Angels, a group of five Nyabinghi Rastafarian drummers and a vocalist named Sister Maureen, will release their eponymous debut album on Richards' Mindless Records on Oct. 14.

    Recorded at the famous guitarist's Ocho Rios, Jamaica villa, the album features drums, chanting, Richards' guitar and bass, and a soulful Irish fiddle.

    Asked about the group's name, Richards joked, "They sing like angels, but they can't fly." (Scott
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  • October 04, 1997

     

    NEW YORK - Beyond the Stones' classic rock groove, there's another beat Keith Richards feels at home with, and that's the Rasta rhythm. He has whiled away many an evening over the past 25 years bonding with a group of Nyabinghi drummers in the front room of his villa in Jamaica. Now, after considering these sessions strictly of the moment, Richards has produced an album with his brotherly collective-dubbed the Wingless Angels for the members' earthy substance yet heavenly voices.

    Due Oct.

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  • April 18, 1997

    Wingless Angels percussion project a soulful success for Keith Richards

    Brian Jones had his Moroccan Drummers of Joujouka, the Neville Brothers have their Wild Tchoupitoulas tribe of Mardi Gras Indians, and now Keith Richards has his Wingless Angels percussion ensemble. Though Richards-dubbed the 'albino' of the group-keeps a low profile as co-producer and sideman for this Jamaican septet, this sounds like a deeply satisfying project for him.

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  • April 18, 1997

    One of the most fascinating aspects of reggae music has always been its unerring ability to reinvent itself, thereby ensuring it remains fresh and vital. Whether it does this by plundering its rich musical heritage for something simply in need of a contemporary twist or by clambering aboard the latest fad-driven bandwagon, it's clear that reggae's inherent faculty for experimentation and diversification continues unabated, albeit with varying degrees of success, failure and downright arseness-all of which are exemplified by this month's round-up.

    Keith Richards may no longer be someone whose

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